TUESDAY MORNING UPDATE

FIRE TRUCK PURCHASES GOES TO A VOTE

Gerry Martin (LinkedIn)

Norwich aldermen last night agree to send a 3-point-2 million dollar bond ordinance to the voters in November. It would pay for five new firetrucks to replace aging ones in the Yantic, East Great Plains, Taftville, and Laurel Hill volunteer fire departments. Alderman Gerry Martin says the firefighters need the new apparatus or their safety is in jeopardy. The only councilman to vote against sending the bond issue to referendum was Mayor Deb Hinchey. She says aldermen shouldn’t approve the ordinance after adopting a city budget that cut municipal jobs. Norwich voters may also determine the fate of another bond issue. The City Council has scheduled an August 7th public hearing on proposed 5-million dollars in borrowing for infrastructure improvements.

NO DECISION ON SCRAPYARD

Tucker Braddock

No action last night from the Norwich City Council regarding a possible city purchase of the former Shetucket Iron and Metal scrapyard along the city’s waterfront. Aldermen went behind closed doors for about an hour, then emerged to adjourn the meeting without comment. City Councilman, and Mayoral candidate Tucker Braddock is hoping the city will put in a bid for the contaminated site when it goes up for auction July 29th. He thinks it could eventually become a park and/or fishing area. He says if the city doesn’t acquire it, a new owner will likely continue operating it as a scrapyard. Opponents say the clean-up would be too costly.

HELPING MILITARY FAMILIES

The State of Connecticut formally adopted a new rule last month that would allow military spouses who are licensed attorneys in other states to apply for temporary licenses to practice here. The ruling goes into effect January 1st and is a unique way for the legal community to show support for military families. The hope is that this decision can open doors for changes to other regulated professions.

HOUSE FINALLY COMING DOWN

A New London house, built in 1866, that had been ordered demolished by the city multiple times since 2011, is slated for demolition again. The effort to save the condemned, historic home owned by Shiloh Baptist Church, began in 2008 but no preservation work was ever done. The demolition is not being challenged by local preservationists. The church applied for a demolition permit last month.

THREE OD’s LAST NIGHT

New London police and firefighters reported to three reported heroin overdoses last night. All three, two men and a woman, were transported to Lawrence and Memorial Hospital and were conscious. Paramedics administered Narcan to the woman before she was taken to the hospital.

MAN FIGHTING SEX CHARGES

The sexual assault trial of a former Lisbon man began yesterday in New London Superior Court. One of the alleged victims, a now 26 year old Rhode Island woman, testified against Douglas Crossley. She is accusing him of sexually touching her and four other girls who were underage at the time. The state alleges that the crimes occurred between 2005 and 2010. Crossley, who has been free on bond since his February 2016 arrest, is vigorously defending himself against the charges.

KILLINGLY MOVES AHEAD ON NOTIFICATION SYSTEM

The Killingly Town Council has given the go-ahead for the town manager to begin implementing a mass notification system to help residents stay informed. Sean Hendricks hopes to have the system up next month. The optional program will give those who register personal alerts regarding emergency situations as well as upcoming votes and local events.

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