FRIDAY MORNING UPDATE

FAUQUET LOSES ONE CHILD

Kirsten Fauquet

Yesterday, Superior Court Judge John Driscoll revoked custody of one of Kirsten Fauquet’s five children and has awarded joint guardianship of the 2-year-old girl to her paternal grandmother and biological father. The move stems from a highly publicized abuse and neglect case out of Groton. Fauquet is approved for weekly supervised visitation with the child. The 2 year old will remain in the home of her paternal grandmother, where she is currently living. The judge said he had not made a decision on the Department of Children and Families’ request to terminate Fauquet’s parental rights.

BUDGET NOT PERFECT

Last night, three local state lawmakers said they like some things about the bipartisan state budget signed into law by Gov. Malloy this week. But they say it’s “not a perfect budget,” yet, it is a “first step”. A public forum was held last night at the Groton Senior Center giving residents a chance to ask questions on the budget. The forum was run by Groton-based state lawmakers.

BOARD WANTS MITCHELL OUT

Kathleen Mitchell (Patch)

The New London Housing Authority Board of Commissioners took the first step this week in its attempt to remove Kathleen Mitchell from the five-member board. Citing bullying behavior and her use of social media to intimidate and criticize fellow commissioners, the board voted 3-2 on Wednesday to ask Mayor Michael Passero to remove Mitchell for her conduct. Passero declined comment on whether he would push to remove Mitchell, said he had yet to receive the official notice. Board members are mayoral appointees.

CONTROVERSIAL BUILDINGS NOW FOR SALE

New London historic preservationists were able to halt demolition of two Bank Street buildings recently, that are now on the market. Bill Cornish, the owner of 116 and 130 Bank St., says he has not yet given up on his plan to tear down the buildings in favor of one larger structure. Those plans are now tied up in a legal battle with an attorney from the state Office of the Attorney General, which is representing the state historic preservation office in an effort to obtain a permanent injunction against razing the buildings. The two sides are due back in New London Superior Court on Nov. 30 for a hearing.

FUNDRAISING JUGGERNAUT

Rob Simmons

A new campaign finance report shows that Stonington First Selectman Rob Simmons and his running mate John Prue have now raised a total of almost $23,000 in campaign funds. In the report, Simmons and Prue raised $12,500, in October, $1,500 of which came from the Republican Town Committee. The rest came from a long list of individual donors. Simmons rejected a challenge by Democratic opponent George Crouse to limit fundraising to $6,000, saying it came after he already had begun fundraising and planned his campaign strategy. Simmons, who raised $33,000 to Crouse’s $5,100 in 2015, defeated Crouse two years ago by 800 votes.

AMISTAD FUNDED

A nonprofit educational organization that now owns and operates the Amistad will receive $263,000 in state funding for 2017-18 under the state budget approved by the General Assembly. But the budget calls for no state aid in 2018-19, which will force the organization calling themselves “Discovering Amistad” to look for more grants and donations. The ship is at Mystic Seaport, where it will spend the winter. It spent most of this year in the state visiting New London, Bridgeport, New Haven and other ports, offering educational programs for children, teens and adults.

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