THURSDAY MORNING UPDATE

DEMOLITION TABLED

Camp­bell Grain Build­ing (Westerly Sun)

The Ston­ing­ton Board of Se­lect­men tabled a pro­posal last night to knock down the re­main­der of the blighted Camp­bell Grain Build­ing. The build­ing owner had started the de­mo­li­tion in 2016 and was fi­nanc­ing the work by sell­ing the posts and beams re­cy­cled from the build­ing. Frank DeCiantis stopped after 80 percent of the building was taken down and finding there was no more salvage value left. Now, he doesn’t have the money to finish the demolition. The town could de­cide to fore­close on the land and take own­er­ship but that would mean the town would be re­spon­si­ble for its up­keep, se­cur­ing it and then try­ing to sell it.

COMPUTER LAB CLOSING

After nearly 40 years in business, Computer Lab in New London is closing this month, leaving many longtime loyal customers saddened and wondering where they can take their Apple products instead. The Computer Lab is authorized to do work on products covered under warranty or AppleCare. Repair places can no longer get authorization to do work under warranty. Local customers will now have to go to an Apple store. The closest locations are in Providence Place Mall and in Farmington. Computer Lab is expected to close Aug. 22nd.

BUSINESS CENTER OPENS

Yesterday, the third women’s business center in Connecticut opened in New London. The center will offer a full slate of workshops, counseling services and long-term training to women and men at every stage of business development. The ribbon-cutting ceremony was attended by U.S. Rep. Joe Courtney and U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal, along with New London Mayor Mike Passero and many state senators and representatives.

TRIBES MEET CANDIDATES

Proposed East Windsor casino

Many of the can­di­dates for gov­er­nor and at­tor­ney gen­eral have met with the state’s two tribal leaders, in ad­vance of Tuesday’s pri­mary elec­tions. Top­ics in­cluded the tribe’s plans for de­vel­op­ing the for­mer Norwich Hos­pi­tal prop­erty in Pre­ston, sports wa­ger­ing and the Mashan­tucket-Mo­he­gan part­ner­ship that’s  to build the state’s third casino in East Wind­sor. The tribe does not en­dorse can­di­dates for of­fice.

MOHEGANS HAVE A PLAN

Mohegan Gaming & Entertainment executives told investors Wednesday that they plan to implement more than $100 million worth of improvements over the next four to five years to help the company against competition. MGM Springfield, the nearly billion-dollar resort casino set to open Aug. 24th in western Massachusetts, some 70 miles from Mohegan Sun, among the biggest concern.  Another casino, Boston Encore Harbor, a Wynn Resorts’ casino project, is scheduled to open in Everett, Massachusetts next year. Tribe officials say it’s difficult to accurately determine what MGM Springfield’s impact will be until it’s open. One official said that smoking will be prohibited at the Massachusetts casinos, which is “a major factor” for gamblers.

REVAMPING ANTI-DRUG CAMPAIGN

The City of Norwich is changing its marketing strategy to save money and better reach young people who could fall into addiction. Norwich Youth and Family Services is using a half million dollar grant it received two years ago to begin a campaign using posters, a website, events and social media to dissuade prescription and other drug misuse among youth.  Last year, Norwich saw its first death by the opioid carfentanil, a large animal tranquilizer that’s up to 5,000 times stronger than heroin. Norwich also saw 32 fatal overdoses in 2017, giving it the second-highest overdose death rate in the state among towns with 10,000 or more people.

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