FRIDAY MORNING UPDATE

CITY EMPLOYEES GET NARCAN TRAINING

Over a dozen Norwich city employees and officials have been trained to administer the opioid overdose-reversing drug. Each employee received a two-dose packet Thursday of the drug they hope they never have to use. Norwich Youth and Family Services received a $7,500 grant from the Community Foundation of Eastern Connecticut to train 100 volunteers in, how and when, to use the antidote.  The next step is to expand the training to local businesses and nonprofit agencies.

STATE GETS MILLIONS TO EDUCATE THE DISPLACED

Connecticut has received over ten million dollars in federal aid so it can make payments to districts for educating children displaced by hurricanes Harvey, Irma or Maria or the California wildfires during the 2017-18 school year. Locally, Norwich will receive $201,000 and Norwich Free Academy will get a little more than $59,000. Groton gets almost $64,000. Ledyard and Montville will receive $33,375 and $4,500 respectively.

MAN CHARGED IN ROBBERY

(Patch)

A New York man was arrested Wednesday by Connecticut State Police in connection with a March 2015 robbery of a Montville gas station. Nicholas Fiore was charged with first-degree robbery, fifth-degree larceny and conspiracy. Fiore has been serving a sentence in New York after confessing to involvement in a March 2015 string of robberies in New York. He denies being involved in the Montville robbery. Police identified Fiore through surveillance video.

RENOVATION APPROVED

A major renovation of the commercial building at 3-9 North Second Ave. in Taftville could begin soon. The owner received site development plan approval late Tuesday from the Norwich Commission on the City Plan for a mixed-use development. It would include 12 apartments, retail space and a proposed restaurant and pub. The brick building, once part of the 19th and early 20th century Taftville Ponemah Mill village, will be connected with the mill once again. The 1895 building had housed the company store, and a social gathering space upstairs, where dances, meetings and even church services for a time were held.

WATERFORD DEBATES PLASTIC BAGS USE

Of­fi­cials are reconsidering sin­gle-use plas­tic bags, with some call­ing for a ban to help pro­tect the en­vi­ron­ment. Oth­ers are cau­tion­ing the move could wreak havoc on Water­ford’s re­tail­ers and keep new busi­nesses out. The pro­posal would ban the light­weight car­ry­out plas­tic bags com­monly used by re­tail­ers and gro­cers but not large, heav­ier bags such as garbage bags. A committee of town leaders will brain­storm ques­tions on pros and cons and le­gal im­pli­ca­tions in the com­ing months with town At­tor­ney Robert Avena. They’ll meet again on Tues­day, Sept. 25th.

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