SUNDAY MORNING UPDATE

DEATH INVESTIGATED

MIDDLETOWN, Conn. (AP) — Police are investigating the death of a woman whose body was found in Middletown.   The body was discovered Saturday in the Westlake area of the city. In a statement, police called it an “untimely death” and said the investigation was in its preliminary stages.   No other details were immediately provided, but police called the incident “isolated” and said there was no danger to the public.

BOY CHARGED IN LIBRARY ASSAULT

Miller Memorial Library

HAMDEN, Conn. (AP) — Police say a teenage boy forced a girl into a bathroom at a Connecticut library and held the victim until her screams alerted others.   The incident happened earlier in the week at Miller Memorial Library.   According to police, the 15-year-old victim was leaving the restroom when the alleged assailant, also 15, jumped out at her and forced her into a bathroom stall where he locked the door and covered her mouth and nose.   The girl managed to scream for help and an adult rushed into the restroom to end the assault.   The New Haven Register reports the boy, who was not identified because of his age, faces charges of first-degree unlawful restraint, second-degree strangulation and second-degree breach of peace. He’s expected to appear in court later this month.

CYCLIST DIES IN CHARITY BIKE RIDE

Ben Davol

NEW HAVEN, CT (WFSB) – Ben Davol who served as a campaign director for John McCain died on Saturday morning while riding in the annual Closer to Free Ride in New Haven.    Several participants told Channel 3 that a man suffered a heart attack in the general area of East Rock Park during the race.   58 year old Davol was a guest on Face The State in February of 2016.   Closer to Free Ride is an event held to raise funds for research and patient care at Smilow Cancer Hospital and Yale Cancer Center.   The ride begins and finishes at the Yale Bowl and has five different race lengths – 10, 25, 40, 65, and 100 miles.

CONNECTICUT SUPREME COURT TO HEAR FIRST CASES OF 2018-2019 YEAR

CT Supreme Court

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Parents’ rights, disability benefits and an attempted murder conviction are among the issues being taken up by the Connecticut Supreme Court as it begins its 2018-2019 year.   The court’s first term of the new year starts Monday as it hears two appeals.   The first involves James Gavis, of Willimantic, who is trying to bar his dead wife’s sister from having contact with his son, who is a minor. The second involves the late Waterbury Fire Chief Thomas Brennan and whether his wife, as executrix of his estate, can receive his benefits for heart and high blood pressure. On Tuesday, the court will hear the appeal of Daniel Buzzeo, of Stamford, who is serving a 15-year prison sentence for attempted murder for trying to hire a hit man to kill his wife.

ANTI-VIOLENCE ACTIVIST KILLING

Anthony Rutherford (Fox 61)

WATERBURY, Conn. (AP) — A Connecticut man who killed an anti-violence activist and her 9-year-old daughter has been sentenced to life in prison.  The Republican-American reports 29-year-old Anthony Rutherford was sentenced Friday in Waterbury Superior Court.   Rutherford pleaded guilty to two murder counts in June in the shooting deaths of his girlfriend, 29-year-old Chaquinequea Brodie, and her daughter, My-Jaeaha Richardson, in their Waterbury apartment in August 2017. Brodie’s 2-year-old daughter was found unharmed at the scene.   Neighbors heard yelling coming from the apartment shortly before the killings.   Brodie’s sister, Alyssiah Wiley, an Eastern Connecticut State University student, was killed in 2013 by her boyfriend, who also is serving life in prison. After Wiley was killed, Brodie and her mother started Mothers of Victim’s Equality, a group that educates about dating and domestic violence.

JUDGE THREATS

Edward Taupier (Middletown Press)

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The Connecticut Supreme Court has rejected the appeal of a Cromwell man convicted of threatening violence against a state judge who presided over his divorce case.   Edward Taupier argued there wasn’t enough evidence to convict him of felony threatening and cited free speech rights. But the court ruled 7-0 against him in a decision released Friday.   Taupier is serving an 18-month prison sentence for threatening Judge Elizabeth Bozzuto, now the state’s deputy chief court administrator. Prosecutors said Taupier sent an email to six acquaintances in 2014 that described Bozzuto’s home and how certain rifles could be fired at it from a nearby cemetery.   He also was sentenced to four months behind bars Wednesday for Facebook posts urging people to kill judges and employees at the Middletown courthouse.

ROAD IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Rhode Island is getting nearly $26 million in additional federal funding for road maintenance and safety projects.   U.S. Sens. Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse announced the Federal Highway Administration funding.   The Rhode Island Democrats say the administration’s annual August redistribution means the state Department of Transportation will have access to money not spent by other states to move forward with road improvement projects that are ready to start now.   The funding is slated to go to several projects, including resurfacing Routes 78 and 6, street maintenance and sidewalk improvements along Route 44 and safety improvements along Interstate 95 in Pawtucket.   The agency must obligate these funds for specific projects before the fiscal year ends Sept. 30.   Rhode Island received $17 million when programs funds were redistributed last year.

CLERGY ABUSE IN RHODE ISLAND

Peter Kilmartin

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — The Rhode Island attorney general’s office says it will begin a review of the investigation methods employed by two other states that announced they are probing possible abuses by Roman Catholic clergy.   Attorney General Peter Kilmartin’s spokeswoman Amy Kempe says the office will not confirm or deny the existence of an investigation, and can’t confirm if the office is considering launching one.   The Providence Journal reports the announcement comes as attorney general’s offices in New York and New Jersey have announced their own investigations.   The actions follow the release of a scathing grand jury report from Pennsylvania’s attorney general.   The Providence diocese said in a statement that it is already “clear practice” to report all sexual abuse allegations to law enforcement.

STRANDED CRUISE SHIP

Star Pride (file photo)

BOSTON (AP) — The U.S. Coast Guard says a cruise ship that became disabled off Massachusetts has cleared an inspection and will be allowed to continue to New York. The Star Pride docked in Newport, Rhode Island, Friday night so it could be inspected.  The vessel, carrying 351 people, became stranded earlier Friday in Buzzards Bay between Woods Hole and Martha’s Vineyard. Windstar Cruises, which operates the Star Pride, said the ship experienced a loss of cooling water for the engine systems, causing an automatic shutdown of the propulsion and auxiliary engines.   After the vessel regained power it was escorted to Newport, where it docked overnight for a Coast Guard inspection.   The Coast Guard said on Twitter Saturday morning that the vessel had been cleared to go to Manhattan.   No injuries were reported.

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