WEDNESDAY MORNING UPDATE

GUBERNATORIAL HOPEFULS DEBATE TONIGHT IN NL

Ned Lamont and Bob Stefanowski (WFSB)

The two major party candidates for Connecticut governor are squaring off in a debate for the first time Wednesday night.  The event featuring Democrat Ned Lamont and Republican Bob Stefanowski is taking place at the Garde Arts Center in New London at 7 p.m.  Stefanowski, of Madison, has worked as an executive at major firms, including General Electric and UBS Investment Bank. Lamont, of Greenwich, founded a company that built telecommunications systems for college campuses.  The debate is sponsored by The Day and WTNH-TV.

PEQUOT ARRAIGNED

Jukumu Reels (WFSB)

A New London judge has ordered Tuesday a 28-year-old Mashantucket Pequot Tribal member to stay away from Connecticut casinos. Jukum Reels was also ordered not to go within 100 yards of a Foxwoods Resort Casino security officer he is accused of punching in the face during a melee on Aug. 28th. Reels told the judge at his court appearance he intends to hire a private attorney. Judge Karyl L. Carrasquilla entered a not guilty plea on his behalf and continued his case, along with a motor vehicle case from Aug. 11, to Oct. 2nd. The victim, Security Supervisor Brooke Wyngaard of Preston, suffered multiple facial fractures and a broken nose in the incident. Reels was released after posting a $50,000 bond.

COTTAGE OPTIONS STUDIED

Nevins Tenant Cottage (The Day)

Water­ford lead­ers are re-ex­am­ining the po­ten­tial costs to re­store and re­use the his­toric Nevins Ten­ant Cot­tage located near the Water­ford Pub­lic Li­brary. Mem­bers of the Water­ford His­tor­i­cal So­ci­ety and His­toric Prop­er­ties Com­mis­sion say the cot­tage’s his­toric na­ture and prox­im­ity to the li­brary make it po­ten­tially ideal for an archival stor­age lo­ca­tion or read­ing room. The cot­tage, built about 1890, was once part of the 350-acre Shaw Farm and be­longed to de­scen­dants of 18th cen­tury New Lon­don mer­chant Natha­nial Shaw II. Nearly $50-thousand is slot­ted for the cot­tage within the town’s cap­i­tal plan for struc­tural re­pairs and up­grades.

HELPING FLORENCE VICTIMS

A Norwich man who helped Florida res­i­dents clean up af­ter Hur­ri­cane Irma last year is one of 20 Con­necti­cut Amer­i­can Red Cross vol­un­teers go­ing to the Caroli­nas as Hur­ri­cane Florence nears. Matt Stevens said he be­gan vol­un­teer­ing af­ter he saw the call for help with Hur­ri­cane Har­vey last sum­mer in the Houston area. Stevens will help run a shel­ter for those who are evac­u­at­ing the coast but may not have the means to leave the state. The Red Cross said about 3,000 peo­ple vol­un­teer in its Con­necti­cut and Rhode Is­land Re­gion. It ex­pects more will be sent to the mid-Atlantic in the com­ing days.

BEAR STEALS FEEDER

(Hartford Courant file)

Backyard bird­seed is blamed for at­tracting a black bear to a home in Waterford around 11:00 Monday morning. The bear had grabbed the bird feeder, then ran into the woods. Depart­ment of En­ergy and En­vi­ron­men­tal Pro­tec­tion spokesman Chris Col­libee said people need to be proac­tive and take steps to re­duce food sources for bears. Bear sight­ings like this have be­come more com­mon as the bear population grows. Bears were seen in 134 of Con­necti­cut’s 169 towns in 2016, ac­cord­ing to DEEP records. So far this year there have been 7,650 bear sight­ings re­ported to DEEP. The high­est num­bers, around 400, have been seen in the cen­tral part of the state. Peo­ple have re­ported fewer bear sight­ings in south­east­ern Con­necti­cut, three in Waterford, but officials say residents still can ben­e­fit from tak­ing mea­sures to pre­vent bear vis­its.

SCULPTURE IS TRASH

Heather Somers

A sculpture at the Mystic Museum of Art is using plastic debris removed from the ocean to raise awareness of the problem of pollution in the world’s oceans. State Sen. Heather Somers has joined forces with the museum to give the problem some traction that “single use plastic products, such as bottles, bags, caps, wrappers and straws, are making their way into Long Island Sound and are being ingested by marine life and affecting the delicate ecosystems in our oceans. Somers’ comments come as Stonington has formed a task force to look into banning single-use plastic bags and straws in town.

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